Updated Thursday 26th of April

Due to unforeseen circumstances this event has been postponed. If you have already purchased a ticket via our website further information will be sent to you via email. We apologise for any inconvenience caused and hope to announce a new date soon.

As we mark the 100th anniversary of the First World War, Alnwick Castle and the Northumberland Fusiliers Museum is delighted to welcome Kate Adie to talk about her latest book ‘Fighting on the Home Front’ which looks at the role of women in the First World War.
 
When war broke out and a generation of men went off to fight, bestselling author Kate Adie shows how women emerged from the shadows of their domestic lives. Kate charts the seismic move towards equal rights with men that began a century ago and through unique first-hand research shows how momentous the achievements of those pioneering women were.

Join us in Alnwick Castle's majestic Guest Hall on Tuesday the 8th of May as Kate shows how woman became a recognised part of the war machine. On the night you will be able to purchase a copy of the book and have it signed.

 

Event Information 

Tickets are £5 per person and are available via our website and on the evening of the event.
You can also purchase a paperback copy of the book in advance which will be reserved for you to collect on the evening, priced at £10 per book.
Entrance and exit to the castle for this talk will be through the Iron Railings on Castle Square (postcode NE66 1NG).
Gates to the castle will open at 6:45 pm, with the talk starting at 7:30 pm.
If parking for this event, please park on the nearby streets (Bailiffgate Road, The Peth, Rattern Row, Walkergate, or the public car parks on Greenwell Road). We recommend you do not park in the main castle car park on Denwick Lane as there will be no access to the castle from this car park.

 

About Kate 

Kate grew up in Sunderland and gained her BA from Newcastle University where she read Swedish.
She became a familiar figure through her work as BBC Chief News Correspondent. She is considered to be among the most reliable reporters, as well as one of the first British women, sending dispatches from danger zones around the world. Kate is also the long-serving presenter of Radio 4’s From Our Own Correspondent and a presenter or contributor to many other radio and television programmes.

As a television news correspondent, Kate’s memorable assignments include both Gulf Wars, four years of war in the Balkans, the final NATO intervention in Kosovo and elections in 2000; the Herald of Free Enterprise disaster at Zeebrugge, the massacre at Dunblane, the Selby rail crash, the SAS lifting of the Iran Embassy Siege in London, the Bologna railway station bombing and the Tiananmen Square protest in Beijing in 1989.

Kate carried out numerous assignments in Northern Ireland throughout "The Troubles" as well as reporting on the referendum to ratify the Good Friday Agreement. Kate covered the Lockerbie bombing and reported from Libya after the London Embassy siege of 1984, reporting from Libya many times thereafter, including the bombing of Tripoli by the US in 1986. She also covered the Rwandan Genocide and the British military intervention in the Sierra Leone Civil War.

She has served as a judge for the Orange Prize for Fiction, now the Bailey’s, and the Whitbread, now the Costa Prize, and recently, the RSL Ondaatje Prize.
Kate has also served as a trustee of the Imperial War Museum and is a trustee of Sunderland Football Foundation.

Kate has honorary degrees from universities including Newcastle, Bath, Nottingham, Cardiff and St Andrews and is Honorary Professor of Journalism at Sunderland University.
Other awards include: Royal Television Society Reporter of the Year 1980, for her coverage of the SAS end to the Iranian Embassy siege.
Winner, 1981 & 1990, Monte Carlo International Golden Nymph Award.
The Richard Dimbleby BAFTA Award 1990.
Kate was awarded the OBE in 1993.

Event Dates

The event is taking place on dates highlighted in red.